Books

Book review: Fever by Deon Meyer

I remember reading Meyer’s first book when I was in high school and being entirely unimpressed with it. Say what you want, sex scenes are always going to be awkward when they’re written in Afrikaans, and now, ten plus years later, I can still remember the line, “Dit gly binne.” This put me off Meyer and I hadn’t touched a book of his until Fever.

Enter my New Year’s resolution to read more, a random recommendation on a Facebook book group, and my love for the post-Apocalyptic genre, and here we are.

I’m glad I gave the author a shot because damn. People, and apparently, bizarrely, King himself, compare Fever to The Stand, but it knocks The Stand’s socks off and keeps going. Of course it has its flaws, but the narrative is so engaging, the premise so well fleshed out, I was more than ready to forgive Meyer his being an old white guy writing about a middle-aged white guy. Fever is one of those books that make you excited to read. It reminds you what good writing can do and what a cool experience good storytelling is.

Fever, the English translation of the original Koors, follows the lives of a father and son as they try to pick up the pieces of civilisation in their own unique ways after a virus wipes out ninety percent of the world’s population. Trials and tribulations – and a deeper conspiracy – abound as they set up a new town. Can Amanzi, the Place of Light, keep human darkness at bay?

So, what’s the verdict?

Title: Fever
Author: Deon Meyer
Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton (2017)
Rating: 4.5/5 (Goodreads rating, for comparison: 4.26/5)
The best feature of the book: It’s just plain good. And it’s South African, which was refreshing.
The worst feature of the book: a) You’re either going to love or hate the plot twist at the end of the book. The novel has been billed as a standalone, but there are a lot of questions left unanswered in favour of that plot twist, so I’d be curious to see if Meyer returns to Amanzi at some point. b) Some of the pseudo-academic jargon is irritating. I don’t know if this is true of the original Afrikaans, but the language is not gender-inclusive, which is noticeable because the ones using it are supposed to be academics, and there’s this whole thing about gender-inclusive/gender-neutral language in academia.
Trigger warnings: Men being assholes to women, but nothing graphic.
You’ll like this if… Is post-Apocalyptic fiction your jam? Boy do I have good news for you!

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