Books

Book review: Lies Sleeping by Ben Aaronovitch (Rivers of London #7)

Depression etc kept me from reading Lies Sleeping by Ben Aaronovitch as soon as I got it back in November of last year, but when I finally started it, I finished it in one afternoon, so I do feel I’ve redeemed my RoL fandom. Aaronovitch has delivered another fun installment of his Rivers of London series, full of the wit, irreverence, and adventure that has become his trademark. No dull, weary or wary slog, these books; they’re quite fresh-faced in tone for all that he’s on the seventh novel of the series, and that’s not including the comics, short stories, and novellas.

But I’d be lying if I said there weren’t signs of strain showing in the narrative, so while I really enjoyed the book – it’s a lot like catching up with old friends, these longer series – there are some issues that niggle. Overall the book’s climax and denouement felt unsatisfactory, rushed and a bit half-arsed, which is a pity because Lies Sleeping resolved some other loose ends (that came up in the previous books) in a tidy way.

Lies Sleeping picks up Peter’s story as he, the Folly and the Met pursue Faceless Man Martin Chorley and turncoat Lesley May. It’s a cat and mouse game, with Chorley seemingly two steps ahead of them the whole time. He has a plan to put London’s most restless spirit to rest for his own cause, and Peter et al try their best to intervene…

So, what’s the verdict?

Title: Lies Sleeping
Author: Ben Aaronovitch
Publisher: Gollancz (2018)
Rating: 3.5/5 (Goodreads rating, for comparison: 4.32/5)
The best feature of the book: It’s a quick, easy read; funny, non-depressing even when depressing, full of interesting stuff about London. The characters all feel like family at this point.
The worst feature of the book: At one point Peter remarks that if you had no idea what he was talking about, you’d best go back and do some reading. Annoying. Old characters and settings are rarely described in Lies Sleeping. I think the practice in multi-book series is to briefly describe things like this for the benefit of new readers who don’t start the series with the first book, but it’s also useful for long-time readers who haven’t committed every single detail to longterm memory. The plot could have done with more finesse. The climax could have been more climactic.
Trigger warnings: Mentions of slavery and implied sexual assault.
You’ll like this if… This is one for fans and stans of urban fantasy,

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